Open main menu

ACR

ACR Story Quotes
ACR274
Gun Information
Full name Adaptive Combat Rifle
Country of origin United States
Manufacturer Remington Arms (Military), Bushmaster (Civilian)
Game Information
Faction Griffin & Kryuger
Manufactured /
Revised by
I.O.P.
Voice actor Ise Mariya
Artist saitom
Released on CN, TW, KR, EN, JP
Chibi Animation
Variant:

Click the marked area to switch between animations. For details regarding animations, please see Animations on the Wiki.

Contents

How to obtainEdit

NORMALHEAVY Not craftable.

DROP Not obtainable as a drop.

REWARD Obtained from loot boxes of event Shattered Connexion. One guaranteed ACR will be given to player upon opening the 777th loot box.

Exclusive EquipmentEdit

There is no exclusive equipment for this T-Doll.

Stats / DataEdit

Stats
 
 Health
 
 Ammo
 
 Ration
58(x1)116(x1) / 580(x5) 20(x1) / 60(x5) 20(x1) / 60(x5)
 
 Damage
18 54
 
 Evasion
6 48
 
 Accuracy
6 54
 
 Rate of Fire
50 77
 
 Move Speed
10
 
 Armor
0
 
 Crit. Rate
30%
 
 Crit. Damage
50%
 
 Armor Pen.
15
     
   
 
     
 
 
     
   
 

Ranking of this Doll's specs relative to other Dolls of the same type.

Ranking of this Doll's specs relative to every other Doll.
Affects submachine guns
Increases rate of fire by 25%
Increases accuracy by 65%

Weapon BackgroundEdit

The ACR (Adaptive Combat Rifle) was an American modular gas-operated rifle designed to be the most advanced rifle platform of its time. The Remington version of the ACR was one of the weapons displayed to U.S. Army officials during an invitation-only Industry Day on November 13, 2008. The rifle platform was also part of the Individual Carbine competition to replace the M4.[1]

The ACR was originally known as the 'Masada', and was designed in the early 2000s by Magpul Industries of Austin, Texas. Magpul's original design combined elements from several different modern rifles, incorporating what was considered to be the best features of each into a single, lightweight, modular rifle. Examples of the design features borrowed by Magpul include the short-stroke gas piston system from the AR-18, the wide use of polymers and the location of the charging handle from various HK rifles, the upper receiver design from the FN SCAR, and the trigger pack, barrel, and fire control group of the AR-15. The Masada rifle also included several features developed by Magpul themselves, such as a quick-change barrel/trunnion system, an adjustable gas regulator, a non-reciprocating charging handle, and storage compartments located in the stock and grip.

In late January 2008, Magpul entered into a licensing agreement with Bushmaster Firearms International. Bushmaster would take over production, future development, and sales of the Masada. When production rights were signed with Bushmaster, the Masada name was dropped from the product, and the rifle became known as the Bushmaster ACR. At the time of the agreement, Bushmaster was owned by an American corporate entity known as Freedom Group, which also owned Remington, Marlin, and DPMS Panther Arms. It was decided that Bushmaster would produce the ACR for the civilian commercial market, while Remington would produce the rifle for military and law enforcement agencies.

The military version of the ACR was produced by Remington Arms, and is a select-fire rifle capable of a cyclic rate of fire of around 650 to 700 rounds per minute in full auto. Meanwhile, the Bushmaster ACR is limited to semi-automatic fire only. The fire selector lever is located over the pistol grip, and is a three position lever on the Remington models (with settings for safe, semi-auto, and full auto) and a two position lever on the Bushmaster models (with settings for safe and semi-auto only). The rifle's standard chambering is for the 5.56×45mm NATO cartridge, however the rifle could be modified to chamber the 6.8×43mm Remington SPC cartridges (the 6.8 SPC being specially designed for U.S. special forces usage). The non-reciprocating charging handle can be installed on either side of the rifle, and the magazine release is also mirrored on both sides of the rifle, making the ACR largely ambidextrous. One of the major aesthetic differences between the Remington and Bushmaster rifles was with the handguard: the Remington model has a five-sided aluminum handguard that can be user configured with MIL-STD-1913 rail elements, while Bushmaster's model features a polymer handguard with heat guards and attachable aluminum tri-rail. The ACR is advertised as being adaptive, and can be quickly disassembled and reconfigured as needed. Parts can be replaced and swapped out quickly in the field without the use of tools. To switch between firing calibers, the user simply has to replace the bolt head and barrel. With access to different length barrels and foldable/extendable stocks, the ACR can be quickly modified from the standard configuration into a carbine, a PDW, or a DMR.

The first Bushmaster prototypes were displayed at the 2007 SHOT Show in Orlando, Florida. Originally scheduled for release in the second quarter of 2008, Bushmaster announced in May of 2008 that the consumer release would be delayed until the first quarter of 2009, owing to a focus on military projects. Later that same year in November, Bushmaster released a statement saying, "The ACR is being redesigned to be a superior offering to compete for the next generation US Army infantry carbine and subcompact weapon requirement and will be available to select customers in 2009". In reality, the rifle would not be made available on the commercial market in significant quantities until 2010. The rifle launched with a retail price of between $2,685–$3,061.00, twice as much as early price quotes of "around $1500". The revelation caused public outcry and dismay from a large portion of the firearms community and potential civilian end-users. In October of 2010, Bushmaster issued a recall of all ACR rifles, instructing users to "Please immediately discontinue the use of your ACR rifle" along with instructions to contact customer support for an RMA. Bushmaster stated that the recall was issued due to "a possible firearms performance issue that may develop with a small number of ACR rifles" and went on to state that "Bushmaster discovered a design flaw which could result in multiple rounds firing continuously when the trigger is pulled". Bushmaster stated that it would cover all of the costs associated with repairs to recalled rifles.

Production of the ACR ceased in 2020 due to Bushmaster's shuttering after parent company Remington declared bankruptcy. Franklin Armory purchased Bushmaster, and announced that a revival of the ACR platform was planned, however as of 2022 the ACR has not yet returned to the market.

Gallery

Main artwork

Gallery consisting of artworks used primarily in-game. For information on how to obtain certain costumes, see Skin Catalogue.

Alternative artwork

Alternate gallery consisting of artworks with slight alterations as well as miscellaneous artworks.

Trivia

  • To give users an idea on how ACR's passive functions, here's a list of a few examples of Dolls that can apply each debuff:
  • This unit addresses herself as Bushmaster ACR in her introduction quote, indicating that she is carrying the civilian semi-automatic ACR.
    • However, a three positional selector is depicted in her art work, indicating that she is carrying the Remington Arms ACR, as that is the only version capable of automatic fire.
    • Since the rifle was not chosen by the U.S. Army, more Bushmaster ACR rifles have been produced and supplied to civilian users, making it the more readily available variant. With the story setting outlining that T-Dolls are fitted older generation projectile weapons purchased from the black market, and given that Bushmaster's ACR is more common than Remington's, this is likely the reason why she addresses herself as Bushmaster ACR.
  • The name 'Masada' given to Magpul's original rifle prototype refers to the Siege of Masada, where the Sicarii rebels and resident Jewish families of the Masada fortress committed mass suicide when under siege by Roman legions in a final act of defiance, choosing death over enslavement.

ReferencesEdit